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Formal report series, containing results of research and monitoring carried out by Marine Scotland Science

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UK Open Government Licence (OGL)

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Survey of the Scottish Solway Firth Cockle Grounds 2015

doi: 
10.7489/1875-1

Scottish Marine and Freshwater Science Vol 7 No 25

This report presents the results of the 2015 survey of cockle (Cerastoderma edule) stocks in the Scottish Solway Firth. It continues a series of surveys conducted between 1990 and 2009 by Marine Scotland Science (MSS) (previously Fisheries Research Services) and a further survey in 2013, conducted by Marine Ecological Solutions Ltd under contract to Marine Scotland (Stamp et al., 2013). Tables in the report are available to download as .csv files.

Data and Resources

Citation: 
Dickens, S., McLay, A., Dobby, H., Goudge, H. and Deamer-John, A. (2016) Survey of the Scottish Solway Firth Cockle Grounds 2015. Scottish Marine and Freshwater Science Vol 7 No 25, 34pp. DOI: 10.7489/1875-1
FieldValue
Publisher
Modified Date
2016-12-19
Release Date
2016-12-12
Identifier
6f5d2f1e-9eab-433c-b2b9-48043db8366c
Spatial / Geographical Coverage Location
Scotland
Temporal Coverage
Thursday, January 1, 2015 - 00:00 to Thursday, December 31, 2015 - 00:00
License
UK Open Government Licence (OGL)
Author
S Dickens
Data Dictionary

The 2015 Solway Firth cockle survey was carried out between August 10th and 20th by staff from Marine Ecological Solutions Ltd (Marine EcoSol) and their sub-contractors Hebog Environmental Ltd, working under contract to Marine Scotland. As in previous Solway shore-based surveys, All Terrain Vehicles (ATVs) were used to collect samples at pre-determined randomly generated locations (stations), during periods of low water. A stratified random sampling design (first stage) was employed at each fishing ground. At Barnhourie a two-stage adaptive sampling design (Francis, 1984; Bailey et al., 1998) was used to target high density areas of C. edule, identified during the first sampling stage. Computer generated random sampling positions were uploaded to Global Positioning Systems (GPS) equipment mounted on the ATVs or carried by hand.

Contact Name
Marine Scotland Science
Contact Email
Public Access Level
Public